Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Birds from a long hot summer pt.II


Chuja Island
Chuja Island
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago
Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Streaked Shearwater Calonectris leucomelas
White-backed Woodpecker Dendrocopus leucotos
Far Eastern Skylark Alauda japonica
Far Eastern Cisticola (Zitting Cisticola) Cisticola juncidis
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
Eastern Great Tit Parus minor
  Last week saw me re-visit Chuja-do, an island roughly halfway between Jeju and the mainland (and relatively close to Gageo!).  I didn't see much from the ferry other than about a dozen Streaked Shearwater. Chuja-do itself was fairly quiet, with a handful of Pacific Swifts seen from atop a hill, and a dead Common Snipe found nearby.  
  If I'm honest, I'm pretty awful when it comes to IDing snipes on sight - I rely more on flushing behaviour when it comes to snipes.  I took some images of the wing and tail in an attempt to better familiarize myself with the key features to look for, but I fear I'd need a month-long intensive snipe course to fully be comfortable with IDing snipes in the field.
  On a trip out to the west coast I spotted a Zitting Cisticola, a Little Ringed Plover, and several Far Eastern Skylarks in a productive patch of farm fields.
  Closer to home, I've recently found a nice quiet spot with at least three confiding White-back Woodpeckers (the official bird of Jeju), and I've been hearing both Lesser and Oriental Cuckoos relatively close to downtown Seogwipo.
  Birds Korea have recently updated their amazing gallery, with quite a few new images and videos.  Do yourself a favour and check it out: http://www.birdskorea.org/Gallery/BK-GA-Gallery-Introduction-2013.shtml

2 comments:

  1. Identifying Snipes is always difficult....
    Somebody said swinhoes and pin-tailed can be distinguished by their plumage and structure, but couldn't understand how they can do that.

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  2. Yes, it seems like for some snipes you really have to have the bird in your hands, which obviously isn't usually the case. I probably rely on flushing behaviour too much with snipes. One day I will be a proper sniper ;)

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